Exhibitions

Matthew Weiner’s Mad Men

Mannequin Preparer and Dresser

The Museum of the Moving Image, March 14-September 6, 2015

Image courtesy of the Museum of the Moving Image
Image courtesy of the Museum of the Moving Image

From MoMI: “This new major exhibition explores the creative process behind Mad Men, one of the most acclaimed television series of all time, now launching its final seven episodes on AMC. Featuring large-scale sets including Don Draper’s office and the kitchen from the Draper’s Ossining home, more than 25 iconic costumes, props, video clips, advertising art, and personal notes and research material from series creator Matthew Weiner, the exhibition offers unique insight into the series’ origins, and how its exceptional storytelling and remarkable attention to period detail resulted in a vivid portrait of an era and the characters who lived through it.” []


 

Fashioning the Body: An Intimate History of the Silhouette

Mannequin Preparer and Dresser

The Bard Graduate Center Gallery, April 3- July 26, 2015

Image courtesy of the Bard Graduate Center
Image courtesy of the Bard Graduate Center

From BGC: “Having garnered high acclaim at the Musée des Arts décoratifs in Paris in 2013, the exhibition Fashioning the Body will present the many devices and materials that women and men have used to shape their silhouettes from the seventeenth century to today, including panniers, corsets, crinolines, bustles, stomach belts, girdles, and push-up brassieres, alongside examples of period garments that were molded by these distinctive understructures.  The exhibition will also look at how lacing, hinges, straps, springs, and stretch fabrics have been used to alter natural body forms.” []


Making/Meaning

Co-curator

Sheila C. Johnson Design Center, April 28-May 25, 2014

Making/Meaning

 

From Parsons: “Making/Meaning showcases the creative and intellectual achievements of Parsons students as it asks questions about how we make meaning as artists, designers, and strategists. The projects featured in this exhibition were selected from an open call that received more than five hundred and sixty submissions from students across the undergraduate and associate’s degree programs at Parsons. They represent the diversity of techniques and methodology that are taught to and used by students to articulate and express their unique viewpoints.” []


 

Designing the Second Skin: Giorgio di Sant’Angelo 1971-1991

Co-curator

Sheila C. Johnson Design Center, December 4-14, 2012

Designing the Second Skin

From Parsons MA Fashion Studies blog: “As Giorgio di Sant’Angelo famously asserted in the 1970s, the body was to be the guide to the designed silhouette. Rather than a garment altering the shape of the body, the body was celebrated and glorified through Sant’Angelo’s work.  Avoiding any type of zipper and or button was his specialty, evoking an incredible sense of freedom for women.  Playing with texture, transparency, and newly discovered fabric technology, Sant’Angelo examined the relationship between exposure and concealment.  This exhibition emphasizes clothing’s intimate connection with the body—the idea of creating a second skin through fashion.  A highlight from the exhibition is a nude sequined jumpsuit worn by Naomi Campbell and featured in an editorial shoot for Harper’s Bazaar in 1991.” []


 

For the Love of Labels: The Art of Designer Ready-to-Wear

Co-curator

Lyndon House Arts Center, November 21, 2008-January 20, 2009

For the Love of Labels

 

From UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences: “An exhibit featuring items from UGA’s Historic Clothing and Textiles Collection housed at the Department of Textiles, Merchandising and Interiors will explore ready-to-wear creations by celebrated fashion designers. The show will include pieces ranging from a 1930s Mariano Fortuny “Delphos Gown” to a 1970s Halston dress and Frankie Welch’s “Peanut Dress,” a souvenir print created to celebrate Jimmy Carter’s presidential inauguration. Other designers represented in the exhibit include Claire McCardell, Lily Pulitzer, Bill Blass, Oscar de la Renta, Pauline Trigere, and Mary McFadden.” []