Image courtesy of William Beaucardet

Image courtesy of William Beaucardet

Excerpt: “David Bowie is makes a strong case for David Bowie as an influential artist and postmodern icon, perpetually shifting personas and borrowing ideas from across the vast landscape of popular culture. […] Co-curators Victoria Broackes and Geoffrey Marsh selected more than three hundred objects from the David Bowie Archive after being granted unprecedented access to the collection, which consists of thousands of photographs, handwritten lyric sheets, and, of course, his memorable stage and screen costumes. Although costumes only constitute a small fraction of the materials that the exhibition uses to chronicle Bowie’s artistic phases, they are certainly one of the key draws for the show. After all, Bowie and fashion are inextricably linked. One can’t discuss his music or other accomplishments without mention of his sartorial choices, as they have played a crucial role in constructing the image of a man whose career is explicitly based around spectacle. David Bowie is recognizes this connection, highlighting the importance of clothing to his music by featuring costumes in a way that transcends museum conventions by displaying mannequins in modes that emulate live stage performances.”


Image courtesy of Vogue

Image courtesy of Vogue

Abstract: “Throughout American history, fashion has served various roles in constructing and upholding the political beliefs that have allowed the nation to be distinguished from its European roots…”


Watch That Man: David Bowie’s Performance of Anonymity

BIAS: Journal of Dress Practice, Parsons The New School for Design, 2015

Image courtesy of Mike Thompson

Image courtesy of Mike Thompson

Excerpt: “In recent years, the term “recluse” has been used to describe David Bowie almost as much as “fashion icon” and “music legend”. His enigmatic presence over the past decade is certainly a stark contrast from his extremely publicized life in the early 1970s, a time when media outlets on both sides of the pond were eager to report on the ever-changing details of the singer’s life and appearance. Today, Bowie remains mostly unseen and unheard…”

Image courtesy of Intellect Books

Image courtesy of Intellect Books

Abstract: “Both admired and criticized, Diana Vreeland’s approaches to exhibiting fashion have left a profound impact on how curators choose to display fashion worldwide. Her ‘Romantic and Glamorous Hollywood Design’ exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art is emblematic of what makes her work so notable in the field of museology. Running from 1974 to 1975, the record-breaking show…”


Image courtesy of Amazon

Image courtesy of Amazon

I contributed entries on varied topics related to American fashion in the twentieth century.

From Amazon: “This sweeping overview of fashion and apparel covers several centuries of American history as seen through the lens of the clothes we wear—from the Native American moccasin to Manolo Blahnik’s contribution to stiletto heels. Through four detailed volumes, this work delves into what people wore in various periods in our country’s past and why—from hand-crafted family garments in the 1600s, to the rough clothing of slaves, to the sophisticated textile designs of the 21st century.”